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Worst States To Live In

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Living Conditions across the States

Quality of life, a term often bandied about yet seldom deeply understood, is the yardstick by which we measure societal progress. Defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an individual's perception of their place in society, it encompasses both material (income, housing) and immaterial (health, education, safety) aspects. In the United States, quality of life varies significantly across its 50 states, reflecting a textured landscape of advantages, opportunities, and challenges unique to each region.

The 'Worst States to Live In Ranking' indexes each state based on these quality of life measures, integrating data spanning a wide spectrum of criteria including healthcare, education, economy, infrastructure, opportunity, fiscal stability, crime and corrections, and natural environment. These intertwined metrics offer a holistic snapshot of the state's well-being, catering to both the tangible and intangible facets of living.

Several noteworthy patterns emerge from the data:

  • Louisiana ranks at the bottom, with a score of just 10.00, revealing the region's pressing challenges across critical quality of life measures such as healthcare, education, and economic opportunity. The state has consistently ranked poorly, suggesting slow progress in improving living conditions. 
  • States in the Southern U.S., including Alabama, Arkansas, and Mississippi, landed in the lowest tier of the ranking, indicating overarching regional struggles in enhancing quality of life. These states share common issues such as low median household incomes, high poverty rates, and under-performing public schools.
  • Interestingly, states known for harsher climates like Alaska also feature towards the bottom of the list, pointing towards possible correlations between environmental conditions and quality of life indices.
  • On the flip side, relatively less populated states such as Washington, Minnesota, and New Hampshire scores high, reflecting commendable performance in areas of healthcare, education, and infrastructure.
  • While it might be tempting to assume that larger states with bigger economies offer a better quality of life, this notion is dispelled by the lower ranks of populous states like California and Texas.

10 Worst States to Live In

Ranking at the very bottom is Louisiana with a disappointing index value of 10.00. This state has consistently fared poorly across critical quality of life metrics including healthcare, education, and economic opportunity. Evidently, the quality of life in Louisiana needs substantial improvements.

Second from the bottom, Mississippi has an index value of 14.56. Many of the state's limitations reflect the broader struggles typical of the Southern U.S, including low median household incomes, high poverty rates, and under-performing schools. 

Moving a little up the ladder, New Mexico comes in third from the bottom, with an index value of 17.75. The state has consistently ranked at the lower end of the spectrum, especially on crime and healthcare measures. 

The cold state of West Virginia scores an underwhelming 20.42 due to challenges such as low workforce participation and high poverty rates.

Alabama closely follows, rounding out the bottom five states with an index value of 20.78, reflecting ongoing struggles in healthcare access and educational attainment amongst other issues. 

Despite its natural beauty and vast wilderness, Alaska ranks sixth from the bottom, with surprisingly low scores in areas like physical wellbeing and crime. Just south of Alaska, Arkansas demonstrates a marginal improvement, wit an index value of 25.93.

Oklahoma, with an index value of 32.97, South Carolina with an index of 36.04, and Kentucky with an index value of 37.81, complete this list.

The Worst States to Live in:

  1. Louisiana - 10.00
  2. Mississippi - 14.56
  3. New Mexico - 17.75
  4. West Virginia - 20.42
  5. Alabama - 20.78
  6. Alaska - 25.85
  7. Arkansas - 25.93
  8. Oklahoma - 32.97
  9. South Carolina - 36.04
  10. Kentucky - 37.81

By State

Full Data Set

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