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Infant Mortality Rate By State

Infant Mortality Rate By State
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Introduction

Infant mortality, constituting deaths of infants before their first birthday, sparks global concern given its profound implications for public health. A crucial indicator of a region's healthcare quality, socio-economic status, and accessibility to medical services, the Infant mortality rate (IMR) is expressed as the number of deaths of infants under one year of age per 1,000 live births. 

  • Mississippi has the highest Infant Mortality Rate in the United States at 9.39 deaths per 1,000 live births, followed by Arkansas and Alabama at 8.59 and 7.56 respectively. Conversely, North Dakota boasts the lowest IMR at just 2.77.
  • An alarming regional trend is apparent in the data- Southern states, including Mississippi, Arkansas, Alabama, South Carolina, and Louisiana, disproportionately dominate the top of the list.
  • In the case of the Northeast, the states show a contrasting trend with lower infant mortality rates on average. Notably, states such as Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island have infant mortality rates below five deaths per 1,000 live births.
  • Midlands states present a mixed picture with varying rates, for instance, South Dakota with an IMR of 6.07 contrasts sharply with its northern counterpart, North Dakota, which has the lowest IMR in the United States.

States with the Highest Infant Mortality Rates

Leading this list is Mississippi, with an alarming infant mortality rate of 9.39 per 1,000 live births.

Following Mississippi is Arkansas, which has an infant mortality rate of 8.59. Meanwhile, Alabama takes the third spot with an infant mortality rate of 7.56. Both these states, like Mississippi, are located in the South, reinforcing a disturbing regional trend of higher infant mortality rates.

The fourth state with the highest infant mortality rate is Alaska—with 7.37 deaths per 1,000 births— breaking the Southern states' stronghold. It's important to note that Alaska's unique geographical and logistically challenging scenario might be contributing to this high mortality rate.

Rounding out the top five is South Carolina, another Southern state, with an infant mortality rate of 7.26. The high infant mortality rates continue with Louisiana (7.24), Oklahoma (7.13), Ohio (7.06), West Virginia (6.80), and Indiana (6.75).

States with the highest infant mortality rates:

  1. Mississippi - 9.39
  2. Arkansas - 8.59
  3. Alabama - 7.56
  4. Alaska - 7.37
  5. South Carolina - 7.26
  6. Louisiana - 7.24
  7. Oklahoma - 7.13
  8. Ohio - 7.06
  9. West Virginia - 6.80
  10. Indiana - 6.75

States with the Lowest Infant Mortality Rates

North Dakota emerged as the leading state, with the lowest Infant Mortality Rate of only 2.77 deaths per 1,000 live births. Following closely is Massachusetts, reported with an IMR of 3.23, highlighting the state’s attention to maternal and infant health. New Jersey, with an IMR of 3.57, and Oregon with an IMR of 3.79, also present strong figures reinforcing their health systems.

New Hampshire and Iowa present nearly identical statistics, with IMRs of 3.96 and 3.99 respectively, aligning them closely with top performers. California, a state with a vast and diverse populace, successfully maintains an IMR of 4.07, indicative of its large-scale healthcare initiatives.

Lastly, New York, Rhode Island, and Washington showcase commendable infant mortality figures with rates of 4.16, 4.30, and 4.36 respectively.

The Lowest Infant Mortality Rates by State:

  1. North Dakota - 2.77 per 1,000 live births
  2. Massachusetts - 3.23 per 1,000 live births
  3. New Jersey - 3.57 per 1,000 live births
  4. Oregon - 3.79 per 1,000 live births
  5. New Hampshire - 3.96 per 1,000 live births
  6. Iowa - 3.99 per 1,000 live births
  7. California - 4.07 per 1,000 live births
  8. New York - 4.16 per 1,000 live births
  9. Rhode Island - 4.30 per 1,000 live births
  10. Washington - 4.36 per 1,000 live births

Full Data Set

Frequently Asked Questions

Methodology